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Dog Training Tips and Do Dogs Get Jealous?

Innocent Until Proven Guilty

Want to see, talk, play, treat, train and reward your buddies remotely when you are away.


Dog Training Tips

You can teach your dog to trade and give up objects easily by making the whole experience a game. The “Take it and drop it” cue teaches your dog to take something you give him and then drop it on cue; this can be hard for some dogs, especially with a high-value object such as a favorite toy or tug rope.

• Start with an object of low value and present it to your dog.

• When he opens his mouth to take the object, say “Take it.”

• Allow him to play with the object, then present him with a duplicate that you have behind your back.

• As your dog drops the object he has in his mouth, say “Drop it” and reward him with the duplicate that you have in your other hand, saying “Take it.”

Keep repeating this exercise; when your dog is consistently complying, you can gradually build up with toys of higher value.

• If your dog does not want to give up the higher-value toy, walk away from him, produce a new toy, and start directing all your interest to that new toy while you play with it.

• When your dog’s curiosity gets the better of him, he will come over and give up the toy he has in his mouth.

• Immediately reward his decision by giving him the new toy and repeating the “Take it,” “Drop it” sequence.

 


Do Dogs Get Jealous?

When a dog guards resources and space, monopolizes a person’s attention or fights with “siblings,” she could be acting out of jealousy.

Although this anthropomorphizes a dog’s intent, the canine expression of jealousy certainly mirrors that of a human. This seems to explain canine behavior that is pushy, resentful, and competitive. It’s very common for a dog to push itself between hugging partners or invade the space of another dog that is being petted.

In fact, the presence of human caregivers can cause fights between dogs that competitively vie for attention. In evolutionary terms, a dog benefits from getting attention from an individual who provides comfort or is a primary food source, as this boosts the dog’s chance of survival.

Humans can mitigate these jealousies by teaching their dogs to share objects, space, and attention and by giving each dog plenty of good experiences while in the other’s presence. Feeding, walking, and petting dogs at the same time can help quell the instinct for a competitive rivalry.

 

 

 

 



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